Tag Archives: SEC Reporting Skills Workshop

Master SEC Reporting and Prepare to Tackle New Challenges – August & September Dates Announced

The complicated world of SEC reporting has now gotten even more complicated! Be sure you are prepared to comply with the recently enacted changes and have a plan in place to deal with the SEC staff “hot buttons”. Attend SECI’s live workshop SEC Reporting Skills Workshop 2017 being held August 17-18 in New York City, August 21-22 in Grapevine and September 25-26 in San Francisco with additional dates and locations listed on the SECI website.

 

http://www.pli.edu/Content/SEC_Reporting_Skills_Workshop_2017/_/N-1z10oe8Z4k?ID=290537

 

Business Combinations Accounting Guidance Now Delivered in a Pragmatic, Practical Way

Gain an in-depth understanding of how to apply the FASB standard (codified in ASC 805) on business combinations, including recent related ASUs, how to make journal entries in specific situations, the areas where estimation and judgment is required, the SEC requirements for financial statements and pro forma information for significant business combinations, and the appropriate financial statement disclosure. Attend SECI’s live interactive workshop, Accounting for Business Combinations being held August 16th in New York City. http://www.pli.edu/Content/Accounting_for_Business_Combinations_Workshop/_/N-1z10od5Z4k?ID=290625&t=WLH7_ADDP

Master SEC Reporting and Prepare to Tackle New Challenges

The complicated world of SEC reporting has now gotten even more complicated! Be sure you are prepared to comply with the recently enacted changes and have a plan in place to deal with the SEC staff “hot buttons”. Attend SECI’s live workshop SEC Reporting Skills Workshop 2017 being held July 20-21 in Las Vegas, August 17-18 in New York City and August 21-22 in Grapevine with additional dates and locations listed on the SECI website.

http://www.pli.edu/Content/SEC_Reporting_Skills_Workshop_2017/_/N-1z10oe8Z4k?ID=290534

The Move to The New Revenue Recognition Standard – Is the Pressure On?

By: George M. Wilson & Carol A. Stacey

 

Now that year-end is over for most calendar-year companies the transition to the new revenue recognition standard is a major focus area. In recent weeks there have been two interesting sources of comment and information about this transition.

 

First, on March 21, 2017 Chief Accountant Wesley Bricker spoke before the Annual Life Sciences Accounting & Reporting Congress in Philadelphia. (If you are thinking “that sounds familiar”, it was at this same conference a year ago that former Chief Accountant Jim Schnurr made some serious comments about the use of non-GAAP measures that previewed the May C&DI’s!).

 

In his remarks, Mr. Bricker focused on the transition to the new revenue recognition standard, saying:

 

“Let me now turn to implementation of the new revenue standard.  This area deserves close attention, both to make sure that the standard is implemented appropriately and timely and to ask whether the appropriate transition disclosures are being made so that investors and other market participants have sufficient time to absorb the anticipated effects of the new standard.

 

…………………………..

 

In the worrisome column, however, some companies need to make significant progress this year in their implementations.  In a survey of public companies released in October 2016, eight percent of respondents at that time had not started an initial assessment of the new revenue recognition standard, while an overwhelming majority of the others were still assessing the impact.

Particularly for companies where implementation is lagging, preparers, their audit committees and auditors should discuss the reasons why and provide informative disclosures to investors about the status so that investors can assess the implications of the information. Successful implementation requires companies to allocate sufficient resources and develop or engage appropriate financial reporting competencies.”

 

The second recent development is the release by Deloitte in a “Heads Up” newsletter in April 2017 of their most recent updated survey “Adopting the New Revenue Standard — Where Do Companies Stand?”

 

In the survey, Deloitte found that many companies that had originally contemplated using a full retrospective have moved more towards the modified retrospective method. And, along with the worries of the Chief Accountant above, they also found:

 

“Slightly more than half of respondents had started to implement the new standard, but most were in the very early phases of adoption.”

 

As always, your thoughts and comments are welcome!

 

Master SEC Reporting and Prepare to Tackle New Challenges

 

The complicated world of SEC reporting has now gotten even more challenging! Be sure you are prepared to comply with the recently enacted changes and have a plan in place to deal with the SEC staff “hot buttons”.  Attend SECI’s live workshop SEC Reporting Skills Workshop 2017 being held April 24-25 in Chicago, May 8-9 in McLean, Va., May 16-17 in Dallas and May 24-25 in San Francisco with additional dates and locations listed on the SECI website.

http://www.pli.edu/Content/SEC_Reporting_Skills_Workshop_2017/_/N-1z10od0Z4k?ID=290559

Jeepers – More Whistleblower Enforcement Cases? – Do We Have the Message Yet?

By: George M. Wilson & Carol A. Stacey

Just a few weeks ago we did the latest in a series of posts about the SEC’s Whistleblower program. That post focused on two significant enforcement cases where companies attempted to impede whistleblowers. For other posts in our whistleblower series, see:

Our post discussing the background of the SOX and Dodd/Frank whistleblower programs

Our post about the total amount being paid-out to whistleblowers exceeding $100,000,000 (It is even more today!)

Our post discussing a company having to pay a $500,000 fine for firing a whistleblower

SEEMS LIKE THE MESSAGE SHOULD BE CLEAR BY NOW! Don’t try to limit how employees can blow the whistle.

But, the Enforcement Division is not done!

In a case announced on January 17 a company paid a $650,000 fine for including language trying to restrict whistleblower rights in over 1,000 severance arrangements. After removing the language the company also voluntarily agreed to conduct annual training for employees about their whistleblowing rights.

In a case announced on January 21 the SEC found a company that actively searched for a whistleblower, to the point of essentially threatening employees. The reason for the hunt was clear, the treasurer and the company had manipulated information related to hedge accounting and was actively trying to hide the fact that certain hedging relationships were not effective. When the SEC began to ask questions about the issue, the company suspected someone had blown the whistle. The company tried to ferret out the whistleblower, compounding their offenses. The company and the treasurer both paid fines.

There is a very important reason for these cases. In many situations a fraud would go undetected if it were not for the conscience and courage of whistleblowers.

It would seem that the SEC is actively searching for more enforcement cases to make the point that it is illegal for a company to try and prevent or impede employees from blowing the whistle.

Not to be too preachy, and hopefully to be a bit practical, here are two thoughts:

For all of us who may see a need to blow the whistle, know that this is never easy, and know that you have rights and protections.

For companies, don’t try to hide problems and make sure any agreements surrounding employee departures don’t have these kinds of restrictions!

 

As always, your thoughts and comments are welcome!

Year-End Planning Topic Number 5 – Disclosure Effectiveness

Our year-end conferences have begun with the presentation of our 12th Annual SEC Reporting & FASB Forum for Mid-sized & Smaller Companies in Las Vegas last week and will continue with our 32nd Annual SEC Reporting & FASB Forums in November and December.

Disclosure effectiveness is a theme that is already emerging from CorpFin at these conferences.

As we think about how we communicate with shareholders this is another year-end planning consideration. We have done a number of posts about disclosure effectiveness and how the SEC (and FASB) are working on projects to make disclosure more effective. This project has roots that go back a good way, and both the JOBS Act and the FAST Act have helped it build momentum.

You can find a nice review of the SEC’s Concept Releases and related proposals about disclosure effectiveness here. All this rule making will, of course, require time as the SEC requests comments and revises its proposals based on constituent feedback.

In the meantime, the Staff is sending a clear message to make disclosures more effective right now. At our recent conference, CorpFin reminded everyone that SEC reports are intended to be communication documents as well as compliance documents and suggested actions we can all take in the context of current rules to make communication more effective:

 

Streamline disclosures,

Eliminate outdated information,

Tailor disclosures, focusing on factors unique to the company,

Don’t use comment letters in a generic sense.

 

These ideas fit nicely with the Staff’s previously discussed ideas we have been discussing for quite a while:

 

Reduce repetition,

Focus disclosure,

Eliminate outdated and immaterial information.

 

All of this dovetails together with a speech by Keith Higgins that started the initiative in 2014. And, with this much mention by the Staff, clearly change is in the wind, and we all have an opportunity to get ahead of the change and make communication better.

 

Making changes to annual and quarterly report disclosure is never a simple process, as the number of stakeholders and reviewers make change very challenging. And, thinking about how best to meet the information needs of investors is never easy.

 

However, many companies are already making changes to disclosure. If you want to find examples, check out American Express and GE. Both have been very proactive in this arena.

 

Now is a good time to consider and search for opportunities to make current disclosure more effective!

 

As always, your thoughts and comments are welcome!

Get the Skills Necessary to Succeed in the Current SEC Reporting Environment

Financial Reporting professionals are constantly challenged to keep on top of changing SEC Reporting requirements. Accountants and Auditors need to know how to prepare and review SEC periodic and current reporting forms, including the 10-K Annual Report, the 10-Q Quarterly Report, and the 8-K Current Report, as well as an understanding of how to comply with the annual proxy requirements and how insider trading rules work. Register today for one of our upcoming live in-depth workshops, SEC Reporting Skills Workshop 2016 being offered October 13-14 in New York City, October 24-25 in Chicago and November 10-11 in San Diego. December dates and locations are also available and posted on our website. Attendees will learn to master Forms 10-K, 10-Q, and 8-K and the proxy statement, use all the important sources of SEC reporting rules and guidance, write an effective MD&A and deal with the SEC staff and understand their “hot buttons,” including frequent comment areas such as revenue recognition, the statement of cash flows, segments, non-GAAP measures, and contingencies.

http://www.pli.edu/Content/Seminar/SEC_Reporting_Skills_Workshop_2016/_/N-4kZ1z11c95?Ns=sort_date%7c0&ID=262877

Brexit and your Second Quarter 10-Q

In the massive press coverage about “Brexit” one of the most frequently used words is “uncertainty”. While the impact of Brexit will differ from company to company it is important, as we come to the end of the June 30, 2016 quarter (or whenever your next quarter end will be), to think about whether the vote and the resulting uncertainty should be dealt with in your SEC reporting.

 

The two most straightforward issues are likely risk factors and MD&A known trends.

 

The risk factor disclosure in Part II Item 1A of 10-Q refers back to S-K 503(c) and requires disclosure of what makes owning your company’s securities “speculative or risky”. Companies should consider whether the uncertainties and already known impacts of Brexit increase risk and deserve mention in risk factors.

 

When a risk factor becomes more probable of having a material impact the risk factor should transmogrify into an MD&A “known trend” disclosure. This disclosure is required when there are “known trends or uncertainties that have had or that the registrant reasonably expects will have a material favorable or unfavorable impact on net sales or revenues or income from continuing operations.” (S-K Item 303). There are similar known trend disclosures for liquidity and capital resources. If you could be affected by market uncertainty, reasonably possible changes in exchange rates or other impacts of Brexit this disclosure may be necessary in MD&A. Lots of judgment here.

 

It is always important to remember that the “reasonably expects” probabilistic test in FR 36 requires disclosure if you cannot say the trend is “not reasonably likely” to come to fruition. (Sorry for the double negative, but it is in the test!). So if there is a 50/50 chance of a material impact, disclosure should likely be made.

 

Lastly, beyond these two issues there are a wealth of other possible accounting and disclosure ramifications, ranging from issues such as possible elevated risk of impairment to tax consequences, depending on your circumstances.

 

As always, your thoughts and comments are welcome.

Getting the New Revenue Recognition Standard into Perspective

As we all know, the new revenue recognition standard will be effective for public companies for periods beginning after December 15, 2017. This change will have challenges for everyone. Even if the new five-step, contract based model does not dramatically change the timing of your company’s revenue recognition, documenting how the new model applies in your case will require some time, and all of us will have to deal with the significant increase in disclosures, particularly the requirement to disaggregate revenues.

 

One place we see some confusion is about what these challenges will look like. This new standard is a complete departure from our old revenue recognition guidance and the detailed, rule based nature of the old standards. Some writers still talk about the “hundreds of pages” of guidance that must be dealt with. This makes it sound like the new standard is a large collection of detailed rules that simply replaces the large collection of detailed rules in the old revenue recognition GAAP.

 

This is not the case.

 

In the ASU the core of the new revenue model starts on page 14 and ends with the last of the disclosures on page 48.   Seems pretty short!

 

It is very principles base guidance! In our workshops, the broad, principles based nature of the new standard creates some of the biggest challenges for companies.

 

The whole standard is based on this principle, from paragraph 606-10-10-2:

 

“the core principle of the guidance in this Topic is that an entity shall recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.”

 

Notice the lack of language about an earnings process being complete or revenue being “realized or realizable”.

 

Each of the five steps and the disclosure requirements also start with a broad principle. Here is an example from step three, determining the transaction price (606-10-32-2):

 

“An entity shall consider the terms of the contract and its customary business practices to determine the transaction price. The transaction price is the amount of consideration to which an entity expects to be entitled in exchange for transferring promised goods or services to a customer, excluding amounts collected on behalf of third parties (for example, some sales taxes). The consideration promised in a contract with a customer may include fixed amounts, variable amounts, or both.”

 

On interesting aspect of this principle is that if there is variable consideration in a contract, it must be estimated! That is a whole new principle and each company will have to assess how to apply it to their circumstances.

 

Because this new revenue recognition model establishes a whole new set of principles, the FASB knew we would all need some help in how to interpret these principles. So, the standard, after the disclosure requirements, includes a number of implementation guidance discussions to explain what the principles are intended to mean. Terms such as “satisfied over time” and “distinct within the context of the contract” are explored. But you won’t find any detailed rules.

 

After the implementation guidance are a number of examples, and here you can find some actual interpretations of the principles which are very helpful. There are not too many of them.

 

As a last source of support for your process of learning about these principles and how to interpret and apply them don’t forget about the TRG. While the TRG does not issue formal guidance, their discussions are rich with examples of how some very experienced professionals are interpreting the standard. And, as you may have heard, the SEC Chief Accountant has said if companies depart from TRG discussions, they should be prepared to support such positions to the SEC staff. (You can read more about that in this speech.)

 

 

So, our tip for today, as you move through your implementation be ready to build an understanding of the principles and how to apply them to your specific circumstances!

 

As always, your thoughts and comments are welcome!